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Kerbside recycling to return to G21 region under landmark agreement with Cleanaway

Cleanaway are proud to be working with Geelong Region Alliance (G21) under a new kerbside waste and recycling contract that will resume previously disrupted services in the region and encourage local reuse for recyclable materials collected.

Industry Updates

December 10, 2019

Highlights

"We’re now asking for everyone’s help to make it a success by getting back in the habit of sorting your recycling, and learning about the changes to what can and can’t be put in your yellow bin." City of Greater Geelong councillor Ron Nelson

Highlights

"We’re now asking for everyone’s help to make it a success by getting back in the habit of sorting your recycling, and learning about the changes to what can and can’t be put in your yellow bin." City of Greater Geelong councillor Ron Nelson

Starting 16 December, municipal kerbside recycling for residents of the City of Greater Geelong, Surf Coast Shire Council, Golden Plains Shire and the Borough of Queenscliffe will resume under a landmark agreement between Geelong Region Alliance (G21) and Cleanaway. To encourage a circular economy within the region, Cleanaway will work with councils to develop innovative local uses for materials collected by identifying local secondary markets that maximise the sustainable reuse of recyclables, with an initial focus on the reuse of glass.

Pictured from left to right: Golden Plains Mayor Owen Sharkey, Surf Coast Mayor Rose Hodge, Greater Geelong councillor Ron Nelson and Queenscliffe Mayor Ross Ebbels

City of Greater Geelong councillor Ron Nelson, Chair, Waste Management portfolio said, “Our community has been disappointed to see the contents of yellow bins being sent to landfill, so the return of our kerbside recycling service is very good news. We’re now asking for everyone’s help to make it a success by getting back in the habit of sorting your recycling, and learning about the changes to what can and can’t be put in your yellow bin. In the meantime we will continue to work on new ideas to make sure we have the most effective recycling system possible in the long-term.”

Councillor Nelson’s message was echoed by the mayors of other G21 councils who called on residents to do their best to put the right thing in their yellow lid bin, to avoid contaminated recycling going to landfill.

To further incentivise recycling, the new waste and recycling services agreement includes a discount for councils with low contamination rates.

Residents are encouraged to stay on top of what can and cannot go in the recycling bin by checking with their local council’s website or social media for the latest advice.

What’s in:
– Empty clean rigid plastic bottles and containers labelled 1,2, 3, 4 and 5, lids separately
– Clean paper and cardboard
– Clean steel food cans, aluminium cans and foil
– Clean glass bottles and food and sauce jars with their lids placed in the recycling bin separately

What’s out:
– Bagged material in any type of plastic bag
– Coated cardboard cartons that are used to package milk, juice and various other liquids
– Soft plastic packaging such plastic bags, bread and frozen food bags
– Polystyrene packaging
– Plastic toys
– Metal pots and pans
– Clothing and footwear

Contact us to learn more about how we’re making a sustainable future possible for communities across Australia.