Energy-from-waste proposal to create more jobs while delivering on sustainability bottom lines

Western Sydney Energy and Resource Recovery Centre will create more than 2,000 jobs across construction and operations including engineering staff

Industry Updates - Resource Recovery

March 17, 2021

Highlights

“After the biggest economic shock of our lifetime, it is critical that we support such major investment in job-creating infrastructure which will underpin our region for many years to come.”

Highlights

“After the biggest economic shock of our lifetime, it is critical that we support such major investment in job-creating infrastructure which will underpin our region for many years to come.”

Cleanaway’s proposal to build an energy-from-waste centre in Western Sydney is set to boost the local economy while powering more than 79,000 homes and businesses and diverting up to 500,000 tonnes of non-recyclable waste from landfill each year.

The proposed Western Sydney Energy and Resource Recovery Centre (WSERRC) will directly and indirectly, create over 2,000 jobs in Western Sydney during construction. Once operational, WSERRC will require a further 50 highly skilled, long-term local jobs in operations, engineering, environmental, maintenance and management roles.

Cleanaway CEO and Managing Director Vik Bansal said, “Energy-from-waste technology delivers on the triple bottom line of sustainability – it’s great for the environment, good for the economy, and has a multiplier effect on creating social benefits for local communities through direct and indirect jobs.

The WSERRC proposal reflects Cleanaway’s commitment to invest in infrastructure across the waste value chain ensuring waste is minimised and resources are re-used and recycled in the best possible way.”

Delivering environmental, economic and social benefits to the community

Cleanaway Project Director James Pearce said, “Cleanaway has long been a part of the Western Sydney community, with approximately 900 people currently employed across 20 sites in the area. The jobs that WSERRC will generate will help establish a new industry and build a specialised workforce to cater for the growth of the investment in Western Sydney.”

“A large-scale construction project such as ours will provide a considerable boost to local businesses and suppliers. Those employed during construction will be spending money locally on goods and services, and we anticipate that contractors will be sourcing materials from local suppliers. Should the project receive the necessary approvals, we look forward to making a meaningful and lasting economic contribution to Western Sydney,” James explained.

David Borger, Western Sydney Director of the Sydney Business Chamber offered his support for the project, “After the biggest economic shock of our lifetime, it is critical that we support such major investment in job-creating infrastructure which will underpin our region for many years to come.”

“Projects using cutting-edge technology such as this that create more jobs close to home are important for ongoing growth in Western Sydney,” Mr Borger said.

As part of a broader commitment to young talent, and to ensure the necessary skills are being developed to support WSERRC, new roles will include a number of apprenticeships.

In 2019, Cleanaway partnered with WPC Group to establish an apprenticeship program which has successfully supported nine apprentices. The partnership enables apprentices to develop a diverse and robust skill set during their studies, preparing them for success in their future careers.

A similar program would be implemented at WSERRC delivering new opportunities for the people of Western Sydney.

Learn more about Cleanaway’s apprenticeship program here: https://www.cleanaway.com.au/sustainable-future/cleanaway-wpc-group/?fbclid=IwAR2m7xFnkCZbg6_oFXWEO7gcGF3zQ9y2LXb7WD4_2WEX_qIRc8ebbwlKomA

About Western Sydney Energy and Resource Recovery Centre (WSERRC)

WSERRC is being developed by Cleanaway and Macquarie Capital. WSERRC will use safe, sustainable energy-from-waste technology to safely divert 500,000 tonnes of local non-recyclable red bin waste from landfill and produce energy to power more than 79,000 homes and businesses in Western Sydney.

Learn more about the WSERRC proposal here and here.

Read our article on why energy-from-waste is necessary and how it can be done safely and sustainably here.

Learn about energy-from-waste technology safety, regulations and emissions here.

Contact us to learn more about how we’re making a sustainable future possible for communities, industry and local governments across Australia.