Cleanaway’s sustainability highlights

Sustainability highlights

At Cleanaway, we believe that all waste is a resource. Our state-of-the-art facilities are designed to maximise resource recovery to improve sustainability outcomes for our customers and communities across Australia.

Resource Recovery

December 9, 2019

Highlights

Making a sustainable future possible with unrivalled reach and scale of nearly 6,000 employees and 5,000 vehicles across more than 300 sites and prized infrastructure assets

Highlights

Making a sustainable future possible with unrivalled reach and scale of nearly 6,000 employees and 5,000 vehicles across more than 300 sites and prized infrastructure assets

At Cleanaway, we believe that all waste is a resource. Our state-of-the-art facilities are designed to maximise resource recovery to improve sustainability outcomes for our customers and communities across Australia.

 

Sustainability highlights

We recovered:
>380,000 tonnes of paper and cardboard
>15,5000 tonnes of plastic
>25,000 tonnes of steel and aluminium
~6,250 tonnes of e-waste
>115 million litres of used oil

Through our container return scheme collections network, more than 2.24 billion containers have been collected in NSW and nearly 760 million containers from Queensland’s Containers For Change scheme.

We have captured more than 115 million cubic metres of landfill gas, turned into nearly 135 million kilowatt-hours (kwh) or renewable energy.

Our robotic washline has sanitised more than 1.1 million Sharpsmart containers, reducing up to 940,000kgs of single use containers to landfill each year.

Contact us to learn more about how we’re making a sustainable future possible.

Resource recovery solutions that made a difference in 2019

Resource recovery solutions that made a difference in 2019

We shine a spotlight on Cleanaway’s resource recovery milestones this year, from investments in infrastructure to the latest capabilities and innovations.

Resource Recovery

Highlights

Electric collections vehicles, investment in resource recovery infrastructure, energy-from-waste proposal, improved recycling outcomes and more

Highlights

Electric collections vehicles, investment in resource recovery infrastructure, energy-from-waste proposal, improved recycling outcomes and more

With the new year fast approaching, it’s a good time to reflect on the progress we’ve made towards a sustainable future and take stock of what more must be done to achieve our mission. From the launch of our electric vehicles to significant expansions in resource recovery infrastructure, here are Cleanaway’s 2019 milestones.

 

1. Electric vehicles in Victoria and WA
Cleanaway marked a turning point in the company’s history when we welcomed our very first fully electric kerbside collections vehicles in Victoria last May, and Western Australia in October. These zero emissions vehicles reduce carbon footprint and noise levels on the road without impacting service levels.

 

2. Welcoming the SKM team to the Cleanaway family
In November, we welcomed 130 new team members from SKM Recycling Group at our newly operational Laverton and Derwent Park Material Recovery Facilities (MRF). The acquisition included two MRFs, a Plastics Recovery Facility (PRF) and two transfer stations in Victoria, and an MRF in Tasmania. The Coolaroo, Hallam and Geelong sites are on track to be fully operational December 2019. Over the coming months Cleanaway will look to optimise operations at the sites, which will result in an increase in the capacity of recyclable materials that can be processed and production of higher quality commodities for sale in local and global markets.

 

3. Western Sydney Energy and Resource Recovery Centre
In October, we launched a plan for an energy-from-waste facility that uses safe and proven technology to turn general waste into electricity to power Western Sydney homes. The proposed facility would offer a recovery opportunity for residual red bin waste that cannot be recovered higher up the waste hierarchy, helping reduce waste to landfill by up to 500,000 tonnes each year while powering up to 65,000 homes.

 

4. Making a safe, sustainable future possible with Cleanaway Daniels
Following Daniels Health joining the Cleanaway family in May 2018, we were proud to introduce Cleanaway Daniels – the new brand for our healthcare services that reflects our expanded offerings. Our full suite of industry-leading healthcare waste solutions offer our customers a total waste management solution that is tailored to healthcare facilities without compromising on safety.

 

5. Closing the loop on sharps containers through ASP Group
In March, Cleanaway completed a strategic acquisition of the ASP Group, a healthcare services and plastics manufacturing business in Western Sydney, bringing together two of Australia’s market leading, and highly complementary, medical sharps waste businesses.
ASP Group manufactures high quality sharps containers onshore at St Mary’s in Western Sydney. This allows us to review the full supply chain of medical containers supplied to the Australian market and explore new ways to close the loop on plastic waste.

 

6. Accessible waste management solutions through Cleanaway’s new website

We launched our new website in August, designed to make it quick and easy for our customers to find tailored waste management solutions through a highly visual layout. The new site has shortcuts for customers who know exactly what they want or detailed information for customers who may not know what service is right for them or require a range of services.

 

7. Recovering food from packaging
Our South East Organics Facility (SEOF) in Dandenong South was complemented with a new depackaging unit at the beginning of the year to recover more food waste from packaging. Our food depackaging unit is able to process large volumes of food waste packaged in aluminium, plastic, liquid paperboard and cardboard (up to 10 tonnes per hour). This means that up to 99% of nutritious organic material can be recovered efficiently and reused to produce high quality mulch and soil conditioners, creating a truly closed loop solution for food waste. SEOF is capable of sorting, decontaminating and shredding more than 100,000 tonnes of Food Organics and Green Organics (FOGO) waste each year.

 

8. Hillsdale Depot in NSW
Opened in June, the new depot supports the City of Sydney’s domestic waste needs and its Sustainable Sydney 2030 Strategy through our fleet of 25 brand new trucks, all fitted with Cleanaway’s in-truck monitoring and reporting system, Cleanaview. Our award-winning education team also works closely with council to help residents improve landfill diversion and recycling rates.

Hillsdale

 

9. Perry Road super site in Dandenong South
Covering an area of 53,000 square meters, the facility is designed to serve our customers better by consolidating our administrative and operational teams from across Greater Melbourne. The facility houses more than 300 staff, a 20-bay workshop facility designed for safe work, vehicle compliance, and maximum productivity of our fleet, along with paved parking areas and fuelling stations to accommodate 164 collection vehicles.

Perry road

 

10. Victorian delegation visits Eastern Creek facility
In November, the Standing Committee on Environment and Planning from the Victorian Parliament Legislative Council visited our Eastern Creek container sorting facility to learn more about the key operations from NSW’s Container Deposit Scheme, Return and Earn that led to more than 2 billion containers returned in 19 months since the scheme began.

return and earn eastern creek

Contact us to find out more about our investments in resource recovery and how we’re making a sustainable future possible for communities all across Australia.

What is a circular economy?

What is a circular economy?

All waste is a resource that can be recycled to create new products again and again

Resource Recovery

October 11, 2019

Highlights

A circular economy is about closing the loop on the products we consume by using a recycled product in the remanufacturing process. From production to consumption to manufacturing, a circular economy brings a product back into the manufacturing process by closing the tail end.

Contact us to learn more about how we make a sustainable future possible.

 

TOMRA Cleanaway hosts Victorian delegation at Eastern Creek facility

TOMRA Cleanaway hosts Victorian delegation at Eastern Creek facility

TOMRA Cleanaway are network operators for NSW's Return and Earn container deposit scheme

Resource Recovery

October 10, 2019

Highlights

The purpose of this visit was to further understand the NSW Container Deposit Scheme and the positive outcomes this scheme has delivered.

Highlights

The purpose of this visit was to further understand the NSW Container Deposit Scheme and the positive outcomes this scheme has delivered.

On 10 October 2019, TOMRA Cleanaway hosted the Standing Committee on Environment and Planning from the Victorian Parliament Legislative Council.

The Standing Committee is undertaking an inquiry into Victoria’s recycling and waste management systems, and the purpose of this visit was to further understand the NSW Container Deposit Scheme and the positive outcomes the scheme has delivered.

The members were hosted at the Eastern Creek Counting and Sorting Centre, where presentations were made about Return and Earn’s operations and performance. There was also the opportunity for a site inspection covering all parts of the operations at the Counting and Sorting Centre.

In attendance from TOMRA Cleanaway were James Dorney, David Hill and Vesna Davidovic, as well as Frank Sufferini representing Cleanaway and Ryan Buzzell and Brent Murray from TOMRA.

Featured in the picture above from the Legislative Council Standing Committee are:

Mr Cesar Melham MLC (Chair of Committee)
Ms Melina Bath MLC
Ms Sonja Terpstra MLC
Ms Nina Taylor MLC
Mr Michael Baker, Committee Manager
Mr Kieran Crowe, Inquiry Officer

For TOMRA Cleanaway and JV Partners, this represented an extremely valuable opportunity to engage with the Standing Committee on Environment and Planning from the Parliament of Victoria, and present and discuss the operations and achievements of the NSW Container Deposit Scheme – Return and Earn.

For more information about Return and Earn, visit NSW EPA’s Return and Earn site and social channels:

Facebook: @returnandearn (https://www.facebook.com/ReturnandEarn/)
Instagram: @returnandearnnsw
Twitter: @NSWGovCDS
Website: returnandearn.org.au

Cleanaway launches plan for energy-from-waste project using leading technology to safely power Western Sydney

Cleanaway launches plan for energy-from-waste project using leading technology to safely power Western Sydney

Resource Recovery

October 3, 2019

Highlights

Australia’s largest waste management company, Cleanaway, today announced plans to bring leading European technology that will convert rubbish from households and local businesses into power for as many as 65,000 Western Sydney homes.

This proposal targets red bin waste that cannot be recycled and would have the capacity to cut Western Sydney’s annual landfill volumes by 500,000 tonnes – almost a third of the red bin waste generated per year in the local area.

Cleanaway has entered into a joint venture with Macquarie Capital’s Green Investment Group to develop the energy from waste project. Cleanaway and Macquarie Capital are co-investing and co-developing the project which will ultimately be operated by Cleanaway.

To date, a site has been acquired for the potential facility at 339 Wallgrove Road, Eastern Creek, located in an industrial area, surrounded by waste and recycling centres.

Preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is underway which will contain information about the project proposal including environmental assessments. It will be released for public consultation mid next year.

Cleanaway CEO Vik Bansal said: “This project will be another milestone for our Footprint 2025 strategy, the development of prized waste infrastructure assets for the optimisation of value across the whole waste value chain – from collections to resource recovery and disposal.

“Western Sydney sends its residual waste to landfill at a rate of 2,400 Olympic sized swimming pools every year. It is costing consumers more and more in tip fees and council rates. Communities are facing real pressure to get better at dealing with waste in a more sustainable way.

“Energy from waste – as a supplement to waste avoidance, reuse and recycling – is that sustainable way. With the technology that is available today, there is an opportunity for Western Sydney to become a leader in smart waste management.

“Our proposal, if successful, would turn rubbish that would have been landfilled into a clean source of energy that supplies the grid and contributes to more affordable power for consumers.

“By diverting waste from our landfills, an energy from waste facility would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 450,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2E) each year. This is the same as taking approximately 100,000 cars off our roads.

“Ambitious, smart cities worldwide, especially the environmental and technology leaders in Europe like Germany, France, Sweden and the UK, have well-established facilities that are an integral part of their waste management infrastructure.

“We are committed to a comprehensive approvals and consultation process that would, if successful, pave the way for a facility using world’s best high-temperature combustion technology to safely create energy from waste – without generating harmful emissions.

“The emission cleaning systems ensure the emissions leaving the plant is cleaned before it enters the atmosphere.

“The proposal will be assessed considering the triple bottom line – making sure it creates social, environmental and economic benefits. We won’t spare any effort to ensure the design is leading edge in terms of environmental controls and safe for the community.

The project team will be talking with the community next. “Critically, we want to bring the community with us. Cleanaway works with communities across Australia and that is a commitment we take very seriously.

“If we are successful, our facility would create 800 jobs during construction and 50 ongoing local jobs and bring new skills to NSW.” he said.

For media enquiries:
Phillip Kelly – Newgate Communications
Tel: 0400 590 282

Visit the website:
www.energyandresourcecentre.com.au

About Cleanaway Waste Management
Cleanaway Waste Management Limited is Australia’s leading total waste management, industrial and environmental services company. Our team of more than 6,000 highly trained staff are supported by a fleet of over 4,950 specialist vehicles working from approximately 300 locations across Australia. With the largest waste, recycling and liquids collections fleets on the road – and supported by a network of recycling facilities, transfer stations, engineered landfills, liquids treatment plants and refineries – we are working hard to deliver on our mission of making a sustainable future possible for all our stakeholders.

About Macquarie Capital
Macquarie Capital has global capability in advisory, capital raising services, principal investment and asset creation. Macquarie Capital’s renewable energy expertise is enhanced by the Green Investment Group, a specialist developer, sponsor and investor with a mission to accelerate to a greener global economy. Together, Macquarie Capital and the Green Investment Group have more than 350 dedicated green energy professionals and has invested in over 30 waste and biomass projects globally including Australia’s first thermal waste to energy project, Avertas Energy in Western Australia.

Acquisition of SKM Debt and Appointment of Receivers to SKM

Acquisition of SKM Debt and Appointment of Receivers to SKM

Resource Recovery

August 23, 2019

Highlights

ACQUISITION OF SKM DEBT AND APPOINTMENT OF RECEIVERS TO SKM

Cleanaway Waste Management Limited (ASX: CWY) announces that it has acquired the senior secured debt (the Debt) in the SKM Recycling group (SKM) from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, the largest lender to SKM, for approximately $60 million.

The Debt is secured against all assets of SKM with the exception of its Glass Recovery Services business (GRS). This includes the property, plant and equipment that form part of a network of five recycling sites, including three material recovery facilities and a transfer station in Victoria and a material recovery facility in Tasmania. The site in Laverton, Victoria includes an advanced plastic sorting facility which separates plastics from material recovery facilities into clean, individual polymer grades for sale or input into a pelletising facility.

SKM employs approximately 170 permanent staff (excluding GRS) and is headquartered in Laverton North, Victoria. The business processed commingled recyclable material from over 30 councils and municipalities in Victoria and Tasmania. SKM ceased accepting recyclable material to most of its sites over three weeks ago.

Following the acquisition of the Debt, Cleanaway has today appointed Mark Korda and Bryan Webster of KordaMentha as receivers and managers for the entire SKM group excluding the GRS entities. The Supreme Court of Victoria had previously appointed liquidators to another company in the SKM group, SKM Corporate Pty Ltd, on 2 August 2019.

KordaMentha will immediately implement a three-point plan with the aim to get the business back to capacity to help ease Victoria’s waste crisis. The rescue and restructure package may include a sale of all or part of the assets. If a sale process is undertaken by the receivers, Cleanaway intends to participate in the process and will undertake a thorough due diligence review of the business.

Commenting on the investment, Cleanaway CEO and Managing Director Vik Bansal said: “The acquisition of the Debt will allow us to work with the receivers to examine viable options for SKM. If a sale process is undertaken and, if we are successful in purchasing any assets, we will return the assets to a sustainable footing. It will also present us with an opportunity to add to our network of prized infrastructure assets as part of our Footprint 2025 strategy.”

Cleanaway will continue to update the market as appropriate.

Media enquiries:
Alan Jury, Domestique Consulting
Telephone: 0418 833 149
Email: alan@domestiqueconsulting.com.au

Cleanaway’s new Perry Road super site in Dandenong South

Cleanaway’s new Perry Road super site in Dandenong South

Resource Recovery

July 10, 2019

Highlights

Cleanaway’s Perry Road Office and Collections Depot in Dandenong South was officially opened last Thursday 4 July 2019 at an event attended by over 150 staff, stakeholders and key customers.

Pictured from left to right: Cleanaway CEO and Managing Director Vik Bansal and General Manager Solid Waste Services VIC/TAS Clete Elms

The event began with a Welcome to Country and Smoking Ceremony performed by Wurundjeri Elder Perry Wandin followed by an opening speech and official opening ceremony by CEO and Managing Director Vik Bansal.

Covering an area of 53,000 square meters, the Perry Road Office and Depot is a consolidation of Cleanaway’s business and operational teams, including the Victoria Post Collections leadership team, Commercial and Industrial and Municipal collections’ business, sales, administration, finance and fleet teams.

The open plan office layout accommodates over 300 staff, and provides spacious working areas, training rooms, changerooms, lunchrooms and amenities for Cleanaway drivers.

The site also houses a 20-bay workshop facility designed for safe work, vehicle compliance, and maximum productivity of our fleet, with paved parking areas for 164 collection vehicles and our new electric vehicle fleet. The site is also equipped with fuelling stations with 100,000 litre capacity, and automatic truck and parts washing bays.

Bringing together our administrative and operational teams from across Greater Melbourne is a key step forward to serving our customers better and making a sustainable future possible for communities across Australia.

Cleanaway’s new Hillsdale Depot launched in NSW

Cleanaway’s new Hillsdale Depot launched in NSW

Resource Recovery

July 2, 2019

Highlights

Director of City of Sydney David Riordan, joined Cleanaway CEO and Managing Director, Vik Bansal and Solid Waste Services (NSW/ACT) General Manager David Clancy to launch Cleanaway’s new Hillsdale depot this June.

The new facility will support the City of Sydney’s domestic waste needs as part of Cleanaway’s seven-year contract to provide waste and recycling services. Cleanaway will also be working closely with Council to help residents improve landfill diversion and recycling rates through our award-winning education team.

Pictured from left: Cleanaway CEO and Managing Director Vik Bansal and Director of City of Sydney David Riordan.

The launch event started with local elders Aunty Donna and Les Daniel leading a Welcome to Country ceremony. This was followed by a Smoking Ceremony where Les had all guests walk through the smoke as a ceremonial gesture to signify new beginnings.

Director of City of Sydney David Riordan spoke about how the facility supports targets outlined in the Council’s Sustainable Sydney 2030 Strategy. Sustainable Sydney 2030 is a set of goals designed to help the city to become as “green, global and connected as possible by 2030” by transforming the way communities live, work and play.

Also in attendance were City of Sydney’s Project Sponsor, Cathy Price, along with Cleanaway partners (Bucher, Mercedes-Benz, Hino, and Stillwell Trucks) who supplied 25 brand new trucks – all fitted with Cleanaway’s Cleanaview technology.

Contact us to find out more about how we help councils and communities make a sustainable future possible across Australia.

Footprint 2025: 2019 and beyond

Footprint 2025: 2019 and beyond

Resource Recovery

February 14, 2019

Highlights

In 2017, Cleanaway launched Footprint 2025, our roadmap to ensure Australia has the right infrastructure in place to support growing communities to manage their waste while maximising resource recovery.

In 2019, we remain committed to meaningful partnerships with government, business and the community to invest in the right facilities and technology to deliver on our mission. Here we summarise some of the highlights from the first half of this financial year.

 

South East Organics Facility

 

In November, our South East Organics Facility opened in Dandenong South, Victoria. The facility is designed to process over 100,000 tonnes of food organics and garden organics (FOGO) each year, servicing kerbside FOGO collections across South East Melbourne. With the addition of the depackaging unit, we can now separate food waste from it’s packaging to recover even more valuable organic material for reuse.

 

Eastern Creek Container Sorting Facility

 

Cleanaway’s Container Sorting Facility in Eastern Creek opened in November 2018. It processes containers collected through the NSW Container Deposit Scheme and is home to a sophisticated and highly automated optical sorting line. This state-of-the-art facility is capable of sorting, baling and distributing up to eight tonnes an hour of high-quality recyclables including aluminium, steel, PET, HDPE and liquid paperboard.

 

Erskine Park Transfer Station

 

Cleanaway’s new Erskine Park Transfer Station (TS) uses cutting edge sorting technology to divert up to 40% from landfill. Material that comes into Erskine Park will be sorted to collect all recyclable commodities and the residual dry waste will be diverted to Cleanaway ResourceCo’s Resource Recovery Facility at Wetherill Park (RRF). RRF converts the material to Processed Engineered Fuel – a sustainable fuel source that can be used as a substitute for coal.

 

Container Refund Scheme, Queensland

 

From 1 November 2018, Cleanaway successfully commenced logistics, processing and refund point services as part of the Queensland Container Refund Scheme, (CRS). Areas of Cleanaway operation include Greater Brisbane, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Hervey Bay and Cairns. The successful mobilisation of 26 new vehicles, over 35 employees and a multitude of new equipment and facilities was a credit to the entire Cleanaway pre and post implementation teams.

 

The Resource Recovery Innovation Alliance (RRIA)

 

Cleanaway and Brisbane City Council (BCC) officially launched the Resource Recovery Innovation Alliance (RRIA) at Brisbane Landfill. In addition to providing waste haulage services with a fleet of 18 new High-Volume-Side-Tippers and Rear-Ejector trailers, Cleanaway manages four Resource Recovery Centres for BCC as well and Brisbane Landfill.

Twelve months of planning by the Qld Solids team to coordinate more than 85 assets and 80 staff culminated in a tremendously successful mobilisation and we have now successfully processed more than half a million customers through our sites and recovered over 50,000 tonnes of recycling from landfill.

 

Packaged organics trial

 

In Adelaide, South Australia, the team piloted a front lift packaged organics service that delivered substantial diversion from landfill for recyclable food organics. Reducing general waste weights by 15% and averaging 400kg collection per 3m3 bin, the success of the trial means the front lift packaged organics service can be rolled out to commercial customers across the state.

 

Welshpool Transfer Station

 

The new Welshpool Transfer Station in Perth opened 7 January after a short commissioning period before Christmas. The transfer station is designed to accommodate 130,000 tonnes per annum, a 30,000 tonne per annum premium to the existing Bayswater operation. Drivers are now accustomed to the unmanned traffic management system, which offers superior turnaround time to past operations. Safety has also seen considerable improvement in terms of yellow gear – truck/driver interaction, with Operators able to override the automated rapid shutting doors to ensure exclusion zone adherence. The site is now exiting the second stage of the project focused on resource recovery plant and equipment.

 

Soil Processing Facility upgrade

 

Our Sydney Soil Processing Facility completed an upgrade that increased the capacity of the facility. The facility is licensed to store and process hazardous soils and can process up to 700 tonnes per day.

Cleanaway is committed to serving you better through our investment in Australia’s resource recovery infrastructure. Our team of more than 5,500 highly trained staff are supported by a fleet of almost 4,000 specialist vehicles, working from a network of more than 250 locations nationwide, equipped and ready to process more recyclables so that as little residual waste as possible is left to be disposed of.

Contact us to learn more about our mission to make a sustainable future possible for every sector, industry and community.

What is a landfill?

What is a landfill?

Resource Recovery

January 10, 2019

Tags: Landfill
Highlights

 

Landfills are an essential component of Australia’s waste management system – providing a final disposal solution for waste that cannot be recovered.

 

What are landfills?

 

A modern landfill is a highly engineered and regulated pit in the ground that is divided into “cells”. Each cell is carefully engineered to maximise compaction and eliminate potential environmental impacts.

These cells are filled with waste that cannot be recycled including:

  • putrescible waste from municipal collections
  • commercial and industrial waste
  • construction and demolition materials

Certain landfills are licensed for particular waste types, for example not all landfills accept putrescible waste and some are licensed to accept hazardous material like asbestos, while others are not.

 

How are landfills built?

 

Cleanaway engineers design cells with six- or seven-layers of lining to protect the environment surrounding the landfill. These layers protect the ground surrounding the cell. Sumps are used to collect liquids that are produced as the waste decomposes. This liquid is called leachate.

The gas produced as the waste breaks down can be collected to generate energy. Here’s how we’re turning landfill gas to power 28,700 homes in Melbourne.

 

How is odour managed?

 

The odours produced by landfills are the result of gases produced by decomposing waste. At Cleanaway, we manage landfill odour through a variety of proactive measures, including:

  • Maintaining adequate soil cover at the active landfill cell
  • Daily site inspections, which include the site boundaries and landfill surface to quickly identify and resolve any issues
  • Installing gas wells to turn landfill gas into energy
  • Utilising portable gas monitors to track air quality
  • Shutting down the site when extreme weather appears, such as strong winds

 

What happens when a landfill reaches capacity?

 

When a landfill reaches capacity, it is “capped” and rehabilitated, to be turned into green spaces such as parks and community grounds. These will be maintained for up to 30 years after capping.

 

What are landfill levies?

 

A landfill levy is a tax applied to the tipping fee to incentivise waste generators to reduce general waste and increase diversion through recycling. Learn more here.

 

Why are landfills necessary?

 

Landfill meets a critical infrastructure need – to deal with the residual waste produced by businesses and households. This waste is projected to increase as populations grow and with current consumer behaviours.

Even with improved recycling rates, there is a need for residual waste to be managed safely and effectively.

The planning, approval and call-in process gives local residents and interested parties the opportunity to make submissions in relation to the proposal for a landfill, and operators are required to meet a number of regulatory requirements as part of the process.

Importantly, local residents have every opportunity to learn about the application and how the site will work.

 

Why is landfill diversion important?

 

All waste is a resource and every effort should be made to maximise value throughout the product life cycle. Through our network of state-of-the-art facilities like the Perth Material Recovery Facility (MRF), the Cleanaway ResourceCo Waste to Processed Fuel plant in Wetherill Park and the new Erskine Park Transfer Station, our goal is to optimise landfill diversion by recovering more material.

It’s all part of our Footprint 2025 roadmap to ensure that Australia has the right infrastructure in place to support communities in managing their waste.

Contact us to learn more about how we make a sustainable future possible by working hand in hand with communities, government and businesses for resource recovery.